The Sandman Star Explains Real-Life Sibling-Like Bond With Dream Actor

The Sandman Star Explains Real-Life Sibling-Like Bond With Dream Actor

Exclusive: Kirby Howell-Baptiste (Death) forms a close, sibling-like relationship with co-star Tom Sturridge (Dream) while filming The Sandman.

With the premiere of Netflix’s The Sandman just around the corner, actor Kirby Howell-Baptiste reveals that she built a sibling-like relationship with her co-star Tom Sturridge. After first being developed as a movie in the early 1990s, The Sandman is finally getting its for-screen adaptation after Netflix agreed to produce the series in 2019. Howell-Baptiste’s casting as Death was announced in May 2021, along with several other cast mates, including Gwendoline Christie, Vivienne Acheampong, Boyd Holbrook, Charles Dance, Mason Alexander Park, Jenna Coleman, Vanesu Samunyai, and Stephen Fry.

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The upcoming The Sandman adaptation is set to follow Neil Gaiman’s comic series of the same name. Netflix’s The Sandman will see Sturridge’s Morpheus, the king of Dreams, escape from his long imprisonment and seek to restore order to his kingdom of the Dreaming. Akin to the comics, this adaptation will travel between the kingdom of Dreaming and the waking world.

Related: The Dreaming Vs The Waking World: What Are The Sandman’s Rules?

In an exclusive interview with Screen Rant at Comic-Con, Howell-Baptiste shares what it was like working with Sturridge on The Sandman season 1. The actor reveals that she developed a sibling-like relationship with Sturridge, just like their characters. As the pair were often on set alone, it allowed them to quickly get to know one another and form a close bond. Read Howell-Baptiste’s full quote below:

“Well, Tom and I, we spent a lot of time literally walking and talking and discussing from the smallest things to the absolute biggest questions in the universe. We kind of did that on and off camera. For the most part, just him and I, and so we bonded very quickly. We connected, we spoke all the time. It’d be just literally him and I in the green room, so we had nothing to do but get to know each other. And I think we really did build a sibling-like relationship.”

Kirby Howell-Baptiste and Tom Sturridge as death and dream in Netflix the Sandman

Dream and Death make up part of the seven incredibly powerful beings known as the Endless. Howell-Baptiste’s character is the anthropomorphic embodiment of death, just like her name suggests, with each sibling embodying the natural force they are named for. In the comics, Death takes a protective older sister position among her siblings, often seen throughout The Sandman series giving advice to Dream. As Howell-Baptiste suggests, Dream and Death’s closeness appears to be highlighted throughout the TV series as official clips and trailers often depict them together. In one of the latest clips released by Netflix, Dream joins Death as she helps an elderly man, Harry, pass away.

The images and clips released so far suggest that Netflix’s The Sandman adaptation will be accurate to its comic counterpart, with Gaiman having a heavy role in the series creation. It seems like Dream and Death’s relationship is also included in this comic accuracy as Sturridge and Howell-Baptiste’s real-life closeness will undoubtedly have a positive impact on their character’s on-screen sibling bond. With The Sandman releasing in just a few days, fans of the comic series won’t have to wait long to see how Sturridge and Howell-Baptiste’s sibling translates to Dream and Death’s.

Next: Why Sandman Didn’t Cast James McAvoy As Dream (Despite Being Perfect)

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Ellisha O’Donnell
(155 Articles Published)

TV/Movie news writer based in Scotland. Always looking for new media to consume, and is obsessed with spoilers. Has way too many opinions on fictional characters. Ellisha began writing for Screen Rant in 2021.

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